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Could your job lead to divorce?

A recent study out of Denmark provided some interesting data about some traits of people who divorce. That study revealed that people at the highest risk of divorce worked in fields dominated by the opposite gender and/or fields where there is a considerable socialization element.

More specifically, the report says that people working in hotels and restaurant have the highest rate of divorce. On the other hand, people working in more isolated roles, like librarians and farmers, have the lowest rate of divorce. Below we look at what — if anything — this information could mean for couples here in North Carolina.

Studies are not perfect

First, it is crucial to know that studies like these come along fairly regularly. They might shed some light onto trends or patterns, but you should not look at them as accurate predictors of what might happen in your own relationship. There is no study that guarantees which marriages will last and which will end because every couple and every individual is different.

Jobs can be a reason for divorce

All that said, jobs can drive two people apart or highlight vulnerabilities. For instance, they might reveal conflicting marital expectations and goals. They could also put spouses in a position to engage in extramarital affairs.

How this can affect the process

In situations where a person’s job is a factor in his or her divorce, that could have an effect on a few different elements of the divorce process itself. 

For example, job requirements like extensive travel or long hours could affect custody and visitation arrangements. If you left your job and still got divorced, you might have grounds to pursue spousal support if you are financially disadvantaged and will have trouble finding work. If an affair with someone at work was one of the reasons for the divorce, it could be an especially contentious process.

So, while you should not expect to divorce or stay married simply because of an occupation, you can prepare for certain events or discussions if factors of your job do play a role in a divorce.